Monthly Archives: January 2016

Necroptosis: How crystals precipitate cell death

Crystal formation plays a defining role in the pathogenesis of a range of common diseases, such as gout and atherosclerosis. Researchers have now elucidated how the insoluble deposits induce cell death.

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How queen bees control the princesses

Queen bees and ants emit a chemical that alters the DNA of their daughters and keeps them as sterile and industrious workers, scientists have found. The team found evidence that workers exposed to pheromones tag their DNA with methylation differently, ...

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Bringing time and space together for universal symmetry

New research is broadening perspectives on time and space. Scientists challenge the long-held presumption that time evolution -- the incessant unfolding of the universe over time -- is an elemental part of Nature.

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Small is different

In the production of margarine, millions of tons of unsaturated fatty acids are converted from vegetable oils using hydrogen. While searching for improved catalysts for these so-called hydrogenation reactions, a research team made a discovery that puts...

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Three RIT students awarded top honors for research on bio-separation techniques

Three students from Rochester Institute of Technology were recognized for their research findings about improvements to bio-separation techniques for lab-on-a-chip medical devices. They were awarded top honors in several categories in the undergraduate...

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Researchers developing cryotherapy device to reduce tissue damage

Cold therapy has long been prescribed for those recovering from orthopedic surgery, muscle inflammation and sports-related injuries, with treatments ranging from ice baths to immersion in whole-body cryotherapy chambers.

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In lung cancer, not all HER2 alterations are created equal

Study shows two distinct causes of HER2 activation in lung cancer: mutation of the gene and amplification of the gene. In patient samples of lung adenocarcinoma, 3 percent were found to have HER2 amplification and another 3 percent were found to have H...

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Too-few proteins prompt nanoparticles to clump

Low concentrations of serum albumin proteins have the ability to bind one-to-one to gold nanoparticles and, upon unfolding, prompt them to aggregate, according to scientists. The finding may be important to those who study diseases caused by protein ag...

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Landscape pattern analysis reveals global loss of interior forest

Between 2000 and 2012, the world lost more forest area than it gained, according to researchers who estimated a global net loss of 1.71 million square kilometers of forest -- an area about two and a half times the size of Texas. Furthermore, when resea...

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Sensing the future of molecule detection, bioproduction

A new method has been developed for engineering a broad range of biosensors to detect and signal virtually any desired molecule using living eukaryotic cells. Plant, yeast, even mammalian cells could be engineered into living detectors of virtually any...

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Vaccine study shapes plan to wipe out rabies in free-roaming dogs

Rabies could be eradicated from street dogs in India with the help of a new smartphone app, a study has shown. Researchers are using the app to track free-roaming dogs that have been vaccinated against rabies.

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Harnessing the oxidizing power of air

Researchers report the catalysis of a highly specific chemical reaction where oxygen from the air is one ingredient and the other, an organic molecule, is selectively 'oxidized'. A simple manganese compound catalyses this reaction. This type of methodo...

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