Monthly Archives: February 2016

Engineered hydrogel scaffolds enable growth of functioning human breast tissue

Researchers have created a hydrogel scaffold that replicates the environment found within the human breast. The scaffold supports the growth of human mammary tissue from patient-derived cells and can be used to study normal breast development as well a...

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Sharing health data while protecting privacy

How do privacy concerns affect how health data is shared? Research explores privacy laws and their effect on health information exchanges in the United States.

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Massive 2014 Colorado avalanche examined

On 25 May 2014, a rain-on-snow–induced rock avalanche occurred in the West Salt Creek valley on the northern flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado (United States). The avalanche mobilized from a preexisting rock slide in the Green River Formation and traveled 4.6 km down the confined valley, killing three people.

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520-million-year-old fossilized nervous system is most detailed example yet found

Researchers have found one of the oldest and most detailed fossils of the central nervous system yet identified, from a crustacean-like animal that lived more than 500 million years ago. The fossil, from southern China, has been so well preserved that ...

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Black widow spiders are color-coded to deter predators without tipping off prey

Secret codes and hidden messages aren't just for computer security experts or kids passing notes in class -- animals use them too. The telltale red hourglass of the black widow spider appears brighter and more contrasting to birds than to insects, find...

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Chemists combine biology, nanotechnology to create alternate energy source

A transformational advance has been made in an alternate lighting source, one that doesn't require a battery or a plug: high-efficient energy transfer between semiconductor quantum rods and luciferase enzymes. Quantum rods and luciferase enzymes are na...

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In grasslands, longer spring growing season offsets higher summer temperatures

Grasslands across North America will face higher summer temperatures and widespread drought by the end of the century, according to a new study. But those negative effects in vegetation growth will be largely offset, the research predicts, by an earlie...

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