Monthly Archives: February 2016

Offshore wind parks: Interactions and local climate

In 2015 alone, more than 500 offshore wind turbines were connected to the grid in Germany. So far, mutual interactions of wind parks and their potential effects on local climate have been approximated with models only. Thanks to their wide installation...

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Understanding ageism prolongs your life

Perceptions about ageism makes people think of older people and is a form of discrimination. This according to a researcher who believes that the concept needs to be redefined to mirror all people’s practical experiences of aging.

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1970s technology solution to internet ‘capacity crunch’

Exactly 50 years ago, Noble prize winner Charles Kao and his colleagues demonstrated the feasibility of using fiber optical cables to transmit information over long distance. Now researchers say that this laser-based technique, first proposed in the 19...

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New insight into the possible risk factors associated with food allergies

Food hypersensitivity is the umbrella term used to describe any condition where there is a reaction to a food. People are tested by measuring levels of a protein in the blood - immunoglobulin E (IgE) - which is linked to allergic reactions. A new study...

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Nanoparticles on nanosteps

New technologies are starved for efficient and inexpensive catalysts. The best materials are made up of nanoparticles, whose properties are the result of their small size. The single catalyst particles have, however, an ugly tendency to cluster into larger particles, thereby reducing their effectiveness. A group of scientists has developed a material that maintains the stability of a “dispersed” catalyst, thus maximiing the efficiency of the process and decreasing costs and wastage.

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Invasive water frogs too dominant for native species

In the past two decades, water frogs have spread rapidly in Central Europe. Using a new statistical model, researchers have now been able to show that local species such as the Yellow-bellied Toad and the Common Midwife Toad are suffering from the more...

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Biodiesel in a caustic flash

Biodiesel represents a potentially cleaner and more sustainable fuel than those derived from crude oil. Now, scientists have developed a high-speed conversion that turns waste cooking oil into fuel using ultrasound and caustic soda.

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Young stars surreptitiously gluttonizing their birth clouds

Astronomers have used a new infrared imaging technique to reveal dramatic moments in star and planet formation. These seem to occur when surrounding material falls toward very active baby stars, which then feed voraciously on it even as they remain hid...

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New target for reducing nerve pain identified

A specific molecule involved in maintaining pain after a nerve injury has been identified and blocked in mice by researchers. These results reveal a promising therapeutic strategy for treating neuropathic pain.

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Developmental psychology: Friendship wins out over fairness

When children decide to share, the giver’s relationships with the pool of recipients determine who gets how much. They will give more to a wealthy friend than to a needy stranger – at least in cases where wealth is measured in stickers.

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Making better enzymes and protein drugs

Natural selection results in protein sequences that are only soluble to the level that is required to carry out its physiological function. However, in biotechnological applications, we need these proteins to survive concentrations that are up to 1000-...

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‘Neoehrlichiosis’ internationally diagnosed, successfully treated in patients without immunodeficiency for the first time

The intercellular bacteria "Candidatus Neoehrlichia", as e.g. Borrelia, can be transferred by ticks. Approx. 4.2 % of indigenous ticks are infected with this rarely explored bacterium which, until today, has been exclusively identified as pathogenic ba...

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Philippines affected by more extreme tropical cyclones

A new study finds hazardous tropical cyclones in the Philippines are increasing in intensity causing widespread damage and loss of life, which may be due to rising sea-surface temperatures.

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When sea levels rise, damage costs rise even faster

Damages from extreme events like floods are even more relevant than the mean sea level itself when it comes to the costs of climate impacts for coastal regions. A team of scientists now provides a method to quantify monetary losses from coastal floods ...

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